A green sticky note with Parkinson’s disease written on it illustrates the need to understand the 5 stages of Parkinson’s disease.

Navigating the Stages of Parkinson’s Disease: What You Need to Know

More prevalent in men, and more prevalent than muscular dystrophy, multiple sclerosis, and Lou Gehrig’s disease combined, Parkinson’s disease affects approximately 7 – 10 million people globally, with another 600,000 US citizens diagnosed each year. Read More
A senior woman reads a prescription medication bottle as she learns about managing medications for seniors.

Managing Medications for Seniors: A Guide to Preventing Overmedication

The days of “take two aspirin and call me in the morning” have morphed into “take two of these…and two of these…and maybe one of those, too!” Nearly forty percent of older adults are taking at least five different prescription medications each day—not to mention vitamins, supplements, and OTC meds. Read More
A woman talks with her mother during dinner, knowing how important it is to watch for changes in your parents’ health over the holidays.

Noticing Changes in Your Parents’ Health Over the Holidays? Take These Steps.

Returning home for the holidays can be a heartwarming experience, filled with cherished moments and family traditions. However, it can also serve as a stark reality check, revealing changes in your parents’ health and well-being that may have gone unnoticed throughout the year. Read More
A man exhibiting the signs of SAD looks forlornly out the window and offers a halfhearted wave.

The Signs of SAD and How Home Health Care Can Help

The holiday season is often a joyful time filled with festivities, family gatherings, and celebrations. However, for some, the fall and winter months can bring about a sense of sadness and despair, leading to a condition known as seasonal affective disorder (SAD). Read More
A woman knows how to better advocate for a senior parent by accompanying her to her doctor’s appointment.

Four Important Ways to Better Advocate for a Senior Parent

“Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It’s not.” — Dr. Seuss, The Lorax Serving as an advocate for a senior parent is perhaps one of the greatest honors—and responsibilities—you’ll have as a family caregiver. Read More
: The adult child of a senior wraps her arm around him as they discuss the behavioral changes caused by a traumatic brain injury.

Behavioral Changes Caused by a Traumatic Brain Injury

While there are many different types of brain injuries, there are behavioral changes expected no matter what type of brain injury occurs. Certain problematic behaviors may be more or less likely depending on the location and extent of the trauma, but your loved one might demonstrate one or more of these behaviors throughout TBI recovery, regardless of the specifics of the injury. Read More
A cartoon man is investigating the traumatic brain injury symptoms in someone’s head.

Traumatic Brain Injury Symptoms for Varying Parts of the Brain

The brain is undoubtedly the most complex and integral part of the body, controlling everything from major heart functions to breathing. It operates behind the scenes, making sure we stay alive, and, in the foreground as the home of our awareness. Read More
An outline of a person’s brain is filled with healthy foods, indicating the way to overcome malnutrition in older adults.

The Long-Term Risks of Malnutrition in Older Adults

In our last blog post, we shared some age-related issues that prevent older adults from eating a healthy diet, but can poor eating also lead to cognitive degeneration? Malnutrition in older adults is a lot more common than many people may realize. Read More
A woman grocery shops with her mother, selecting foods that will bolster elderly nutrition.

Top Tips for Overcoming Elderly Nutrition Obstacles

Most of us enjoy a delicious meal – the comforting scents and tastes, the gratifying sensation of a full stomach. For a lot of older individuals, though, a number of health conditions can ‌hinder their enjoyment of meals or even their ability to shop for healthy foods, which can lead to malnourishment in many cases. Read More
Two older women who are benefiting from laughter in dementia care.

The Role of Joy and Laughter in Dementia Care

Providing care for someone you love with dementia is definitely nothing to laugh about. However, research is increasingly pointing towards the benefits of laughter in dementia care, and adding humor may be just what the doctor ordered to boost well-being for a loved one. Read More